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Selon National Geographic les 10 mets québécois à découvrir

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Le célèbre mag américain National Geographic a un palmarès des 10 mets québécois à découvrir dans la belle province.

Au top du palmarès :

1. Poutine

2. Les bagels de Montréal

3. Tire sur la neige dans les Laurentides et en Montérégie

4. Les fromages des Cantons de l'est

5. Le Shish Taouk à Montréal

6. Le smoked meat à Montréal

7. La Tourtière de Québec (et non du Lac St-Jean !)

8. Le coucous à Montréal

9. Le Tassot haïtien à Montréal

10. L'agneau de Charlevoix

  1. Poutine

    Poutine just might be Quebec’s signature food. The messy pile of fries, gravy, and cheese curds isn’t new, but in recent years it’s experienced a renaissance, spreading across Canada and beyond. Gourmet versions have appeared in trendy gastro-diners and even the New York Times has jumped on board, celebrating poutine’s arrival in Manhattan.

    The traditional take is still best for poutine newcomers. That means picking up a basic version—thick-cut, home-style fries, homemade gravy, and fresh curds—from a roadside chip truck. The trucks are found on busy city streets and along highways across the province.

  2. Bagels in Montreal

    Montrealers swear by their bagels, which are smaller and denser than their famous New York cousins. The Montreal-style bagel is wood-fired, and many of the city’s bagel joints do their baking within view of the seating area. Grab a table near the flame-filled oven for a perfect break on a winter day.

    The two big-name rivals are St-Viateur Bagel and Fairmount Bagel. St-Viateur has several locations around town; the Monkland and Mont-Royal cafes are the most sit-down friendly. Fairmount has one 24-hour location, and its bagels are also available at many Montreal grocery stores.

  3. Tire sur la Neige in Montérégie and Laurentians

    Quebec is known for all things maple-related, but this is one of the province’s most distinctive offerings. Tire sur la neige, or sometimes simply tire d’érable, is a taffy formed by pouring still hot, boiled maple sap directly onto fresh snow. The result is a soft, flexible candy that begs to be eaten immediately.

    Tire sur la neige is available at most sugar shacks. These visitor-friendly maple syrup production outfits are found across southern Quebec, with the highest concentration in the Montérégie region (on the south shore of the St. Lawrence, near Montreal) and the Laurentians.

  4. Cheese in Eastern Townships

    Quebec’s cheese scene is so vibrant that there is an entire route des fromagesdesigned for cheese tourists. The route includes producers across the province, but if you have limited time, the Eastern Townships has a large number of options.

    Part of the reason for the province’s thriving dairies is its legalization of young, raw-milk cheeses—the production of soft cheeses that have been aged less than 60 days is banned in much of North America. Ask about local specialties wherever you find yourself. Rather than copying famous French cheeses, Quebec’s producers have been creating varieties of their own.

  5. Shish Taouk in Montreal

    Shish taouk is Montreal’s street-meat staple. It’s a local variation on a chickenshawarma—marinated, boneless chicken, roasted on a vertical spit and then sawed off and piled on a pita with pickled veggies and hummus—and it is ubiquitous in the city.

    There’s some confusion over the naming of the dish—shish taouk and shawarma mean different things in different parts of the Middle Eastern dining diaspora these days—so be sure to clarify what you’re ordering. If you just ask for “shawarma,” you’re likely to be served beef.

  1. Smoked Meat Sandwich in Montreal

    Don’t call it pastrami. Montreal’s sandwich of choice bears some similarities to the New York deli specialty, but there are key differences, too, in the process and spices used to cure the beef brisket and in the resulting flavor.

    The undisputed king of smoked meat is Schwartz’s Montreal Hebrew Delicatessen. Schwartz’s has been slicing and serving since 1928, and it’s still in its original location on Saint-Laurent Boulevard. Pull up a chair, order a smoked meat on rye, and take part in an 80-year-old tradition.

  2. Tourtière in Quebec City

    Tourtière is a traditional Quebecois meat pie. The filling varies from region to region, but it often involves minced pork, beef, or wild game. The pies are sold in grocery stores across the province, but one of the best places to sample one is atAux Anciens Canadiens, a restaurant in Quebec City that specializes in old-fashioned Quebecois cuisine.

    In addition to its tourtière, Aux Anciens Canadiens also serves other classics: traditional pea soup, baked beans, pig’s knuckle ragout, and the essential Quebec dessert, maple syrup pie.

  3. Couscous in Montreal

    As the world’s second largest Francophone city, Montreal is a big draw for French-speaking immigrants. These days it's particularly those from North Africa and the one-time French colonies of the Arab world. More than 20 percent of the city’s residents claim Arab or North African origins, and the result is an impressive array of regional cuisines available to visitors. “Couscouseries” have sprung up, featuring Moroccan, Tunisian, and Algerian specialties. Many of them are clustered in the Plateau Mont-Royal area.

  4. Haitian Tassot in Montreal

    Tassot is a classic Haitian dish, made with jerked goat or beef, marinated in citrus juice. As Montreal’s Haitian community continues to grow (it made up 2 percent of the city’s population in the 2001 census), tassot is increasingly available, along with other staples of French Caribbean and Creole cuisine. One favorite Haitian option is Ange & Ricky, a no-frills spot near Jean Talon Market. Grab a platter of tassot, rice, and fried plantains to go.

  5. Lamb in Charlevoix

    Charlevoix lamb is one of a kind, and its producers have the law backing them up on that. In 2009 the region became the first in North America to have a food product legally protected: just like French Champagne or Italian Parma ham, only authentic Charlevoix lamb can be marketed as such.

    The Charlevoix region extends east of Quebec City and north of the St. Lawrence. It’s a remarkably diverse area, mixing tidal flats with mountains, agricultural areas, and fjords, and it’s a designated UNESCO Biosphere Reserve—so even if you’re not much of a lamb eater it’s an area worth visiting.

source : http://travel.nationalgeographic.com/travel/top-10/foods-to-eat-in-quebec/

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Le célèbre mag américain National Geographic a un palmarès des 10 mets québécois à découvrir dans la belle province.

Au top du palmarès :

1. Poutine

2. Les bagels de Montréal

3. Tire sur la neige dans les Laurentides et en Montérégie

4. Les fromages des Cantons de l'est

5. Le Shish Taouk à Montréal

6. Le smoked meat à Montréal

7. La Tourtière de Québec (et non du Lac St-Jean !)

8. Le coucous à Montréal

9. Le Tassot haïtien à Montréal

10. L'agneau de Charlevoix

  1. Poutine

    Poutine just might be Quebec’s signature food. The messy pile of fries, gravy, and cheese curds isn’t new, but in recent years it’s experienced a renaissance, spreading across Canada and beyond. Gourmet versions have appeared in trendy gastro-diners and even the New York Times has jumped on board, celebrating poutine’s arrival in Manhattan.

    The traditional take is still best for poutine newcomers. That means picking up a basic version—thick-cut, home-style fries, homemade gravy, and fresh curds—from a roadside chip truck. The trucks are found on busy city streets and along highways across the province.

  2. Bagels in Montreal

    Montrealers swear by their bagels, which are smaller and denser than their famous New York cousins. The Montreal-style bagel is wood-fired, and many of the city’s bagel joints do their baking within view of the seating area. Grab a table near the flame-filled oven for a perfect break on a winter day.

    The two big-name rivals are St-Viateur Bagel and Fairmount Bagel. St-Viateur has several locations around town; the Monkland and Mont-Royal cafes are the most sit-down friendly. Fairmount has one 24-hour location, and its bagels are also available at many Montreal grocery stores.

  3. Tire sur la Neige in Montérégie and Laurentians

    Quebec is known for all things maple-related, but this is one of the province’s most distinctive offerings. Tire sur la neige, or sometimes simply tire d’érable, is a taffy formed by pouring still hot, boiled maple sap directly onto fresh snow. The result is a soft, flexible candy that begs to be eaten immediately.

    Tire sur la neige is available at most sugar shacks. These visitor-friendly maple syrup production outfits are found across southern Quebec, with the highest concentration in the Montérégie region (on the south shore of the St. Lawrence, near Montreal) and the Laurentians.

  4. Cheese in Eastern Townships

    Quebec’s cheese scene is so vibrant that there is an entire route des fromagesdesigned for cheese tourists. The route includes producers across the province, but if you have limited time, the Eastern Townships has a large number of options.

    Part of the reason for the province’s thriving dairies is its legalization of young, raw-milk cheeses—the production of soft cheeses that have been aged less than 60 days is banned in much of North America. Ask about local specialties wherever you find yourself. Rather than copying famous French cheeses, Quebec’s producers have been creating varieties of their own.

  5. Shish Taouk in Montreal

    Shish taouk is Montreal’s street-meat staple. It’s a local variation on a chickenshawarma—marinated, boneless chicken, roasted on a vertical spit and then sawed off and piled on a pita with pickled veggies and hummus—and it is ubiquitous in the city.

    There’s some confusion over the naming of the dish—shish taouk and shawarma mean different things in different parts of the Middle Eastern dining diaspora these days—so be sure to clarify what you’re ordering. If you just ask for “shawarma,” you’re likely to be served beef.

  1. Smoked Meat Sandwich in Montreal

    Don’t call it pastrami. Montreal’s sandwich of choice bears some similarities to the New York deli specialty, but there are key differences, too, in the process and spices used to cure the beef brisket and in the resulting flavor.

    The undisputed king of smoked meat is Schwartz’s Montreal Hebrew Delicatessen. Schwartz’s has been slicing and serving since 1928, and it’s still in its original location on Saint-Laurent Boulevard. Pull up a chair, order a smoked meat on rye, and take part in an 80-year-old tradition.

  2. Tourtière in Quebec City

    Tourtière is a traditional Quebecois meat pie. The filling varies from region to region, but it often involves minced pork, beef, or wild game. The pies are sold in grocery stores across the province, but one of the best places to sample one is atAux Anciens Canadiens, a restaurant in Quebec City that specializes in old-fashioned Quebecois cuisine.

    In addition to its tourtière, Aux Anciens Canadiens also serves other classics: traditional pea soup, baked beans, pig’s knuckle ragout, and the essential Quebec dessert, maple syrup pie.

  3. Couscous in Montreal

    As the world’s second largest Francophone city, Montreal is a big draw for French-speaking immigrants. These days it's particularly those from North Africa and the one-time French colonies of the Arab world. More than 20 percent of the city’s residents claim Arab or North African origins, and the result is an impressive array of regional cuisines available to visitors. “Couscouseries” have sprung up, featuring Moroccan, Tunisian, and Algerian specialties. Many of them are clustered in the Plateau Mont-Royal area.

  4. Haitian Tassot in Montreal

    Tassot is a classic Haitian dish, made with jerked goat or beef, marinated in citrus juice. As Montreal’s Haitian community continues to grow (it made up 2 percent of the city’s population in the 2001 census), tassot is increasingly available, along with other staples of French Caribbean and Creole cuisine. One favorite Haitian option is Ange & Ricky, a no-frills spot near Jean Talon Market. Grab a platter of tassot, rice, and fried plantains to go.

  5. Lamb in Charlevoix

    Charlevoix lamb is one of a kind, and its producers have the law backing them up on that. In 2009 the region became the first in North America to have a food product legally protected: just like French Champagne or Italian Parma ham, only authentic Charlevoix lamb can be marketed as such.

    The Charlevoix region extends east of Quebec City and north of the St. Lawrence. It’s a remarkably diverse area, mixing tidal flats with mountains, agricultural areas, and fjords, and it’s a designated UNESCO Biosphere Reserve—so even if you’re not much of a lamb eater it’s an area worth visiting.

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Si une citation en langue étrangère doit être faite pour étayer un propos, la traduction doit être immédiate, complète et dans le même message.

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Le célèbre mag américain National Geographic a un palmarès des 10 mets québécois à découvrir dans la belle province.

Au top du palmarès :

1. Poutine

2. Les bagels de Montréal

3. Tire sur la neige dans les Laurentides et en Montérégie

4. Les fromages des Cantons de l'est

5. Le Shish Taouk à Montréal

6. Le smoked meat à Montréal

7. La Tourtière de Québec (et non du Lac St-Jean !)

8. Le coucous à Montréal

9. Le Tassot haïtien à Montréal

10. L'agneau de Charlevoix

  1. Poutine

    Poutine just might be Quebec’s signature food. The messy pile of fries, gravy, and cheese curds isn’t new, but in recent years it’s experienced a renaissance, spreading across Canada and beyond. Gourmet versions have appeared in trendy gastro-diners and even the New York Times has jumped on board, celebrating poutine’s arrival in Manhattan.

    The traditional take is still best for poutine newcomers. That means picking up a basic version—thick-cut, home-style fries, homemade gravy, and fresh curds—from a roadside chip truck. The trucks are found on busy city streets and along highways across the province.

  2. Bagels in Montreal

    Montrealers swear by their bagels, which are smaller and denser than their famous New York cousins. The Montreal-style bagel is wood-fired, and many of the city’s bagel joints do their baking within view of the seating area. Grab a table near the flame-filled oven for a perfect break on a winter day.

    The two big-name rivals are St-Viateur Bagel and Fairmount Bagel. St-Viateur has several locations around town; the Monkland and Mont-Royal cafes are the most sit-down friendly. Fairmount has one 24-hour location, and its bagels are also available at many Montreal grocery stores.

  3. Tire sur la Neige in Montérégie and Laurentians

    Quebec is known for all things maple-related, but this is one of the province’s most distinctive offerings. Tire sur la neige, or sometimes simply tire d’érable, is a taffy formed by pouring still hot, boiled maple sap directly onto fresh snow. The result is a soft, flexible candy that begs to be eaten immediately.

    Tire sur la neige is available at most sugar shacks. These visitor-friendly maple syrup production outfits are found across southern Quebec, with the highest concentration in the Montérégie region (on the south shore of the St. Lawrence, near Montreal) and the Laurentians.

  4. Cheese in Eastern Townships

    Quebec’s cheese scene is so vibrant that there is an entire route des fromagesdesigned for cheese tourists. The route includes producers across the province, but if you have limited time, the Eastern Townships has a large number of options.

    Part of the reason for the province’s thriving dairies is its legalization of young, raw-milk cheeses—the production of soft cheeses that have been aged less than 60 days is banned in much of North America. Ask about local specialties wherever you find yourself. Rather than copying famous French cheeses, Quebec’s producers have been creating varieties of their own.

  5. Shish Taouk in Montreal

    Shish taouk is Montreal’s street-meat staple. It’s a local variation on a chickenshawarma—marinated, boneless chicken, roasted on a vertical spit and then sawed off and piled on a pita with pickled veggies and hummus—and it is ubiquitous in the city.

    There’s some confusion over the naming of the dish—shish taouk and shawarma mean different things in different parts of the Middle Eastern dining diaspora these days—so be sure to clarify what you’re ordering. If you just ask for “shawarma,” you’re likely to be served beef.

  1. Smoked Meat Sandwich in Montreal

    Don’t call it pastrami. Montreal’s sandwich of choice bears some similarities to the New York deli specialty, but there are key differences, too, in the process and spices used to cure the beef brisket and in the resulting flavor.

    The undisputed king of smoked meat is Schwartz’s Montreal Hebrew Delicatessen. Schwartz’s has been slicing and serving since 1928, and it’s still in its original location on Saint-Laurent Boulevard. Pull up a chair, order a smoked meat on rye, and take part in an 80-year-old tradition.

  2. Tourtière in Quebec City

    Tourtière is a traditional Quebecois meat pie. The filling varies from region to region, but it often involves minced pork, beef, or wild game. The pies are sold in grocery stores across the province, but one of the best places to sample one is atAux Anciens Canadiens, a restaurant in Quebec City that specializes in old-fashioned Quebecois cuisine.

    In addition to its tourtière, Aux Anciens Canadiens also serves other classics: traditional pea soup, baked beans, pig’s knuckle ragout, and the essential Quebec dessert, maple syrup pie.

  3. Couscous in Montreal

    As the world’s second largest Francophone city, Montreal is a big draw for French-speaking immigrants. These days it's particularly those from North Africa and the one-time French colonies of the Arab world. More than 20 percent of the city’s residents claim Arab or North African origins, and the result is an impressive array of regional cuisines available to visitors. “Couscouseries” have sprung up, featuring Moroccan, Tunisian, and Algerian specialties. Many of them are clustered in the Plateau Mont-Royal area.

  4. Haitian Tassot in Montreal

    Tassot is a classic Haitian dish, made with jerked goat or beef, marinated in citrus juice. As Montreal’s Haitian community continues to grow (it made up 2 percent of the city’s population in the 2001 census), tassot is increasingly available, along with other staples of French Caribbean and Creole cuisine. One favorite Haitian option is Ange & Ricky, a no-frills spot near Jean Talon Market. Grab a platter of tassot, rice, and fried plantains to go.

  5. Lamb in Charlevoix

    Charlevoix lamb is one of a kind, and its producers have the law backing them up on that. In 2009 the region became the first in North America to have a food product legally protected: just like French Champagne or Italian Parma ham, only authentic Charlevoix lamb can be marketed as such.

    The Charlevoix region extends east of Quebec City and north of the St. Lawrence. It’s a remarkably diverse area, mixing tidal flats with mountains, agricultural areas, and fjords, and it’s a designated UNESCO Biosphere Reserve—so even if you’re not much of a lamb eater it’s an area worth visiting.

Dire que le shish taouk, le coucous et le tassot sont des mets québécois, c'est de pousser les accomodements un peu loin. Ce journaliste n'a pas chercher beaucoup. Sans vouloirs dénigrer ces 3 plats, ils ne représentent en rien la cuisine du Québec à l'extérieur de Montréal. Essayer de trouver l'un de ces plats digne de leur nom à l'extérieur de Montréal est une mission presque impossible. Il ne faut pas confondre cuisine québécoise et cusine ethnique ou alors il aurait dû aller également à l'excellent resto "La Traite" à Wendake.

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Comme les Québécois ne sont pas les seuls au monde à manger du fromage, des frites, des bagels ou de l'agneau. Le palmarès traite des versions montréalaises et québécoises de ces mets.

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Comme les Québécois ne sont pas les seuls au monde à manger du fromage, des frites, des bagels ou de l'agneau. Le palmarès traite des versions montréalaises et québécoises de ces mets.

et pourtant, au #8-9, ils parlent pas du tout de 'versions Québécoises' des mets traditionnels.

c'est juste la #5 qui parle d'une variation du shawarma.

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C'est un aspect du Canada que je veux découvrir. L'art culinaire.

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il y a pas grand mets québécois dans ce palmarès!

plutôt affligeant et insultant pour justement la gastronomie québécoise et ses traditions culinaires de voir cette liste... 3 sur 10 qui n'ont rien a y faire, et la tire qualifiée de ''met''

bref on sont passés les cipates, ragouts de boulettes, fèves au lard, pâté au poulet, soupe aux gourganes, pets de soeurs, sucre à la crême!

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disons que si on lis le titre de l'article :

Foods to Eat in Quebec

c'est pas spécifié des mets traditionnels.. mais ça serait la moindre des choses de mettre la vrai nourriture de l'endroit pour les touristes, comme c'est dans la section 'travel' du site... je pense que quand les touristes visitent un endroit comme le Canada, ils veulent pas manger des mets Chinois..

il manque aussi la queue de castor miammm

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ça me fait penser aux américains, qui ou qu'ils aillent cherchent des Mc Do!

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C est n importe quoi ... La cuisine Québécoise est largement plus variée et comporte des plats traditionnels bien meilleurs que certain de ceux figurants sur cette liste ( en l occurrence ceux qui ne sont pas québécois ) ! Le rédacteur de l article n a, en effet, pas du chercher bien loin pour ecrire ce grand n importe quoi !

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hmmm, ce soir , j'ai fais des cigares aux choux à la mijoteuse, très bon :biggrin2:

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Et les Anciens Canadiens, bof bof comme resto ...

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Bonjour,

 

Alors j'ai été à quebec, y a un mois, j'ai mangé la poutine, c'est bon et ça tient au corps! mais ce que j'aime c'est vos soupes!!!! On a été sur l'ile d'Orléans manger dans une cabane à sucre, on s'est régalé!!!!!

Bon mon mari voulait manger une tarte au sucre et on n'a pas eu le temps!!!!!

 

J'ai hâte d'y retourner!

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il y a 8 minutes, sossoetstef a dit :

Bonjour,

 

Alors j'ai été à quebec, y a un mois, j'ai mangé la poutine, c'est bon et ça tient au corps! mais ce que j'aime c'est vos soupes!!!! On a été sur l'ile d'Orléans manger dans une cabane à sucre, on s'est régalé!!!!!

Bon mon mari voulait manger une tarte au sucre et on n'a pas eu le temps!!!!!

 

J'ai hâte d'y retourner!

Elle est très facile à faire.  Une recette parmi d'autres :

https://www.metro.ca/recettes-et-occasions/recettes/tarte-au-sucre

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ohhh merci Bencoudonc!!!!!! c'est très gentil!!!!! je vais essayer ça!!!!!

Je vous envoie un bisou de France!!!

 

 

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      Traduction Google :

      La péninsule de la Gaspésie au Québec

      Le long des côtes du Québec, les feuilles d'érable rouges tournent rappelant la feuille sur le drapeau du Canada. Sur la péninsule de Gaspé, les arbres ont les eaux bleues du golfe du Saint-Laurent en toile de fond. Randonnée dans les montagnes du Parc National de la Gaspésie, ou feuille-peep tandis que l'observation des baleines dans le parc national Forillon, où sept espèces de baleines se rendent à Octobre.

    • By Woony
      Hey, hey !

      Je m'ennuis un peu (voir même énormément !).et j'me suis dit que je pourrais poister quelque chose qui n'a absolument rien à voir avec l'immigration pour une fois, question de relaxer.
      Moi et mon Danois (Mon mari haha.) nous parlions de bouffe... plus précisement des spécialités nationales au travers le monde (Je sais, ... conversation quand même intéressante... qui donne faim.)
      Pis là, on en est venu à son pays (Le Danemark) pis y me parlait de bien des trucs que je ne connaissais pas. Alors, j'ai commencé à lui parler du Pâté Chinois, du pouding chômeur...

      Je me suis dit ensuite: "Pourquoi ne pas demander à mes 'amis' du forum ce qu'ils en pensent ?"

      Alors... vu que je suis nulle en bouffe, je vais vous le demander ici, question de faire un rescencement simple.

      Avez-vous des idées de bouffe typiquement québecois que je pourrais faire goûter à mon Danois ? Parce que apart le Pâté Chinois et le pouding chômeur, j'ai rien qui me vient en tête (La nulle... Haha!).

      Envoyez vos réponses ! Je suis curieuse de savoir ce qui est d'ici... (Et j'me sens déjà stupide puisque j'suis d'ici mais les recherches internet sont pas fructueuses...!).
    • By immigrer.com
      Notre blogueuse de Vancouver signe un billet sur la gastronomie de la ville.

      À lire en page d'accueil.

      http://www.immigrer.com/blog/blueberry/5409-a-table-a-vancouver

      Bonne lecture !
    • By immigrer.com
      National Geographic a visité Montréal et fait un reportage photo à ne pas manquer.

      http://travel.nationalgeographic.com/travel/city-guides/taste-of-montreal-photos/

      Appli NG https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/a-taste-of-montreal/id526949604

      Photo : MATHIEU DUPUIS

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